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verbs

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Past Perfect Continuous Tense

The present perfect continuous is an important verb form for talking about recent events and their durations. Read about the rules for using the present perfect continuous tense, how we form it, and tons of example sentences!

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Future Continuous Tense

The future continuous is a rare but challenging verb form in English. It is used to describe actions that will be in progress at a specific point in the future. Read about the rules for using the future continuous tense and how we form it, with charts and over 25 example sentences!

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Present Perfect Continuous Tense

The present perfect continuous is an important verb form for talking about recent events and their durations. Read about the rules for using the present perfect continuous tense, how we form it, and tons of example sentences!

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Past Perfect Tense

The past perfect is an important verb form for describing events in the past. Read about the rules for using the past perfect tense, how we form it, and tons of example sentences!

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Past Continuous Tense

The past continuous is an important and challenging verb form in English. It is used to describe actions that were in progress at a specific point in the past. Read about the rules for using the past continuous tense and how we form it, with charts and over 25 example sentences!

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Present Continuous Tense

The present continuous is a common but challenging verb tense in English. It is used to describe actions that are happening at the current moment. Read about the rules for using the present perfect tense and how we form it, with charts and over 25 example sentences!

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Present Perfect Tense

The present perfect is a common but confusing verb tense in English. It is used to connect the past to the present.. Read about the rules for using the present perfect tense and how we form it, with charts and tons of example sentences!

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Simple Future Tense

The simple future is a very common verb tense used to talk about plans and expectations in English. Read about the rules for using it, how we form it, and tons of example sentences!

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Simple Past Tense

The simple past is a very common English verb tense used to talk about actions that happened at a specific time in the past. Read about the rules for using it, how we form it, and tons of example sentences!

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Simple Present Tense

The simple present is the most common and useful verb tense in English. It is used to talk about repeated actions and to describe people or states of being. Read about the rules for using the simple present tense, how we form it, and tons of example sentences!

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Most Common English Verb Tenses

Which verbs are most important to learn in English? How common is each verb tense? Do we really need to learn the future perfect continuous? This article provides data on the frequency of each English verb tense and aspect!

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Most Common English Verbs

Verbs are some of the most powerful words in a language. If you want to know which words to study first when you’re learning English, this list of the 30 most common verbs is the best place to start!

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3 Types of -ing Verb

Ready for some challenging academic grammar?

English grammar can be difficult because sometimes the same word works differently in different situations. This is true for -ing verbs, which can do three different things.  

Let's look at the 3 types:

Three types of -ing verb

Three types of -ing verb

CONTINUOUS VERBS

The man is walking

This is the most basic one: a present continuous verb. The subject in the sentence is "man" and "is walking" tells us what he is doing right now. If you see an -ing verb after a be verb (am, is, are, was, were), it is probably a continuous verb.

Another name for continuous verbs is progressive   verbs.  Continuous and progressive are the same. 


PARTICIPIAL ADJECTIVES

The walking man lives with my friend Paul.   

or 

The man walking across the street lives with my friend Paul.  

In both of these sentences, walking  works like an adjective, not a verb. Walking describes the man, and the verb in the sentence is lives. When an -ing verb describes a noun, we call it a participial adjectiveParticipial adjectives can come before or after the noun, but it is more common to put them after the noun. 

Read a little more about participial adjectives here.


GERUNDS

The man likes walking.  

In this sentence, we have a subject: the man. We have a verb: likes . What is the -ing verb here? It's the thing that the man likes. What does he like? Walking. Walking is the object of like. What are some other things you can like? Sports, travel, English. All nouns. Object of verbs are nouns, so walking is acting as a noun here. That's what a gerund is: an -ing verb that works like a noun. 


More free English resources

 

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Review of Participles

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Review of Participles

Remember:

Participles (or participial adjectives) are verbs with -ED and -ING endings that can work like adjectives, describing people and things.

 -ED participles (past participles) usually describe how we feel, as in, "I feel exhausted."

-ING participles (present participles) usually describe things that make us feel that way, as in, "That hike was exhausting."

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Review of English Participles Card

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